PREVIOUS HOT SPOT - SANDY CAPE- Tasmania

Sandy Cape Tasmania


VIEW PAST HOT SPOTS - CLICK HERE

Sandy Cape - Tasmania

sandy cape tasmania The curve of wide sandy beach swept away to the south and to a low headland that stood proud above the white curl of the breakers that washed around it. It was a calm day too, or certainly what Tasmanian west coasters would call 'calm', but still the swells broke on the shore with a consistency that belied their temper and the tumultuous seas for which this area is known.

We slipped up a gear as the firm hard-packed sand of an ebbing tide allowed us the luxury of top gear and 60kph as we raced southward to our lighthouse topped goal. Then suddenly we were standing on the brakes as we came upon a sheet of fresh water spewing across the beach, eroding the sand and leaving a sheer step down into the rushing water and then back up before the smooth hard packed sand returned.

These creeks and the quicksand they often form are normally a couple of the big hassles you find on a run south along this coast but during our time there, the area was in one of the worse droughts on record. So, luckily for us, the rivers and creeks that normally rush across the beach were either locked into a lagoon a 100 metres of so from the sea or were just a faint trickle of their normal self.

lighthouse sandy cape tasmania The curve of wide sandy beach swept away to the south and to a low headland that stood proud above the white curl of the breakers that washed around it. It was a calm day too, or certainly what Tasmanian west coasters would call 'calm', but still the swells broke on the shore with a consistency that belied their temper and the tumultuous seas for which this area is known.

We slipped up a gear as the firm hard-packed sand of an ebbing tide allowed us the luxury of top gear and 60kph as we raced southward to our lighthouse topped goal. Then suddenly we were standing on the brakes as we came upon a sheet of fresh water spewing across the beach, eroding the sand and leaving a sheer step down into the rushing water and then back up before the smooth hard packed sand returned.

These creeks and the quicksand they often form are normally a couple of the big hassles you find on a run south along this coast but during our time there, the area was in one of the worse droughts on record. So, luckily for us, the rivers and creeks that normally rush across the beach were either locked into a lagoon a 100 metres of so from the sea or were just a faint trickle of their normal self.

Still, in the end it was a creek that stopped our blast south, but that was beyond Sandy Cape, which had been our planned major destination. Time, as always, had been our chief limiting factor and what should have been a few days spent down at the Cape, fishing, snorkelling for crays and abalone, exploring the area and enjoying this wild region had degenerated into a day trip down and back.

There’s good camping at the Cape and some great fishing and diving. Still don’t go there on your own – the beach is too hairy for that!
sandy cape tasmania

sandy cape tasmania

Travel Planner
The best way to get to Tassie is via the Spirit of Tasmania ferries from Melbourne or Sydney. For more details, ph: 13 20 10, or check the web at: spiritoftasmania.com.au.

The best book is 'Offroad Tasmania - 4WD tracks In Tasmania', by Chris Boden. Check the web at www.roving.com.au.

The best touring map is the 'Tasmania Visitors Map', produced by the Dept of Primary Industries, Water & Environment.

A permit is required to drive the Balfour Track and any of the beaches on the west coast, including the run south of Green Creek to Sandy Cape and beyond. These are available from the P&WS ranger office at Arthur River, ph: 03 6457 1225.

VIEW PAST HOT SPOTS - CLICK HERE